Posts Tagged ‘Julian Velard’


10.10.2021

Julian Velard – Please Don’t Make Me Play Piano Man

De Amerikaanse singer/songwriter Julian Velard schreef een heerlijk humoristisch lied met Please Don’t Make Me Play Piano Man. Het is bedoeld als opvolger van de klassieker van Billy Joel uit 1973. Alleen de eerste zin al “It’s 11 o’clock on Wednesday” verwijst naar “It’s nine o’clock on a Saturday”, de eerste zin van het origineel. En daarna volgen er nog veel meer. Hieronder zie je beide teksten, zodat je ze zelf kunt vergelijken.

Het lied Piano Man van Billy Joel was gebaseerd op zijn eigen ervaring als bar pianist in Los Angeles in The Executive Room Piano Bar op Wilshire Boulevard 3953, waar hij 6 maanden werkte in 1972 & 1973. Vanwege een conflict met zijn platenmaatschappij was hij gevlucht uit New York, en om toch de rekeningen te kunnen betalen trad hij op als Bill Martin, dat refereert aan zijn eigen naam William Martin Joel. Hij kon namelijk zijn echte, bekendere naam niet gebruiken vanwege dat conflict. De karakters in het lied, zijn echte mensen die hij in de bar ontmoette, zoals John de barman en Paul de romanschrijver. De serveerster was zijn eigen vrouw Elizabeth Weber, die later zijn manager werd.

Het is grappig dat Margaret, de moeder van Julian Velard, ooit werkte als zingende cocktail serveerster. Zijn vader Maxime zat in de Tweede Wereldoorlog als Joods kind ondergedoken in Parijs. Joel’s vader Howard was een klassiek pianist wiens Joodse familie uit Duitsland gevlucht was naar Zwitserland en toen het daar te gevaarlijk werd naar de VS.

Julian Velard maakte naast dit lied ook een musical met als titel Please Don’t Make Me Play Piano Man en een EP die Play Piano Man heet. Hier vertelt hij in een podcast meer over zijn liefde voor de muziek van Billy Joel.

Please Don’t Make Me Play Piano Man
It’s 11 o’clock on Wednesday.
I’m badly in need of break.
There’s a beautiful blonde singing next me,
she’s making all kinds of mistakes.

She says, I heard this song once when I was 16,
And I’ve loved it my whole life long.
It’s my 21st birthday, and I’m really drunk,
and everyone will sing along.

Oh no no no no no, Oh no no no no, no no.

Please don’t make me play Piano Man,
‘cause I’ve already played it 5 times tonight.
I don’t expect you to understand,
but my hands are too sore
and my heart is too tired,
to put up a fight.

Tom at the bar has his face in his phone,
he never remembers my name.
He pours the drinks while he clicks the links,
searching for fortune and fame.

He says, buddy can you help me find someone online,
this pretty young thing I just met?
She’s a corporate lawyer from the Upper East Side,
her dad’s worth a billion I bet

Oh no no no no no, Oh no no no no, no no.

Bob is in some kind of retail.
I think he sells second hand clothes.
And he’s talking with Tim or maybe it’s Jim.
They’ve all been at my last three shows.

And the waitress is angry and miserable,
while the Jersey boys jump up and down.
They shout and they scream,
they just do what they please,
‘cause this is their night on the town.

Please don’t make me play Piano Man,
‘cause I’ve already played it 5 times tonight.
I don’t expect you to understand,
but my hands are too sore
and my heart is too tired,
to put up a fight.

I’d say the bar’s pretty empty,
but it’s just your average Wednesday.
Billy Joel’s rocking the Garden,
and this place is four blocks away.
At 11:05 they come tumbling in,
they fill up their drinks and I fill up with fear.
‘Cause it cuts like a knife, I’ve sang it all my life.
Man, what am I doing here?

Oh no no no no no, Oh no no no no, no no.

Please don’t make me play Piano Man,
‘cause I’ve already played it 5 times tonight.
I don’t expect you to understand,
but my hands are too sore
and my heart is too tired.
To put up a fight.

Hier speelt Billy Joel zijn zijn lied Piano Man tijdens een optreden in 1975 in The Old Grey Whistle Test, de muzikale tv show van de BBC.

Piano Man
It’s nine o’clock on a Saturday,
the regular crowd shuffles in.
There’s an old man sittin’ next to me,
makin’ love to his tonic and gin.

He says: “Son can you play me a memory?”
I’m not really sure how it goes.
But it’s sad and it’s sweet
and I knew it complete,
when I wore a younger man’s clothes.

La-la-la de-de da.
La-la de-de da da-dam.

Sing us a song you’re the piano man.
Sing us a song tonight.
Well we’re all in the mood for a melody,
and you’ve got us feelin’ alright.

Now John at the bar is a friend of mine.
He gets me my drinks for free.
And he’s quick with a joke
or to light up your smoke,
but there’s someplace that he’d rather be.

He says Bill I believe this is killing me,
as a smile ran away from his face.
Well I’m sure that I could be a movie star,
if I could get out of this place.

Oh, la-la-la de-de da.
La-la de-de da da-da.

Now Paul is a real estate novelist,
who never had time for a wife.
And he’s talkin’ with Davy who’s still in the navy,
and probably will be for life.

And the waitress is practicing politics,
as the businessmen slowly get stoned.
Yes they’re sharing a drink they call loneliness,
but it’s better than drinkin’ alone.

Sing us the song you’re the piano man.
Sing us a song tonight.
Well we’re all in the mood for a melody,
and you’ve got us feelin’ alright.

It’s a pretty good crowd for a Saturday,
and the manager gives me a smile.
‘Cause he knows that it’s me
they’ve been comin’ to see,
to forget about life for a while
And the piano it sounds like a carnival,
and the microphone smells like a beer.
And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar,
and say man what are you doin’ here?

Oh, la-la-la de-de da.
La-la de-de da da-dam.

Sing us the song you’re the piano man.
Sing us a song tonight.
Well we’re all in the mood for a melody,
and you’ve got us feelin’ alright.